Raman Effect

Authors

  • Promita Ghosh

Keywords:

Raman Effect, spectrum, wavelength, polarisation

Abstract

This article is about the Raman effect and the characteristics of Raman lines.

When a beam of monochromatic radiation is passed through a transparent medium, a fraction of the incident radiation gets scattered. Most of the scattered radiations has the same wavelength as the incident one. But few are scattered with a difference in wavelength. This type of scattering was first observed in liquids by C.V. Raman in 1928 and is known as the Raman effect or Raman scattering. Scattering without charge in frequency is known as Rayleigh scattering. The scattered lines on the high wavelength side are called Stokes lines and those on the low wavelength side are called the anti-Stokes lines.

These weak lines of modified wavelengths are usually referred to as Raman lines or Raman spectrum and the wavelength shift from the parent (Rayleigh line) line is called Raman shift.

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References

Modern atomic and nuclear physics—A.B. Gupta.

Published

2021-07-09

How to Cite

[1]
P. . Ghosh, “Raman Effect”, TEMSJ, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 66-67, Jul. 2021.

Issue

Section

Articles